CMT & SD Golra - Picture Gallery
 

A pair of the Sexton SPA vehicles languishing in the scrapyard at CMT&SD Golra. Both the Sexton and M-7 Priest were replaced by the 155mm M-109 in the 1980s. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

One of the many M-47M at the scrapyard. Both types of muzzle breaks on the 90mm gun barrel can be seen on the tanks present. The M-47M was the first of the Patton types to be retired by Pakistan. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

This Iraqi MTLB APC, is one of the trophies from the 1991 Gulf War. Though Pakistan's role in the war was overshadowed by other nations an active part was taken in securing trophies. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

Two of the Ferret armoured cars that languish at the depot are in a rather worse state than most of the other vehicles. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

Two of the M-19 SPAA vehicles showing the tw types of muzzle break on the 40mm barrels. The M-19 served during both major Indo-Pak wars but has long since been replaced. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The M2 twin 40mm guns are still present in all of the M-19s. Though combat tested in WWII the guns were hard hitting, but in the jet age they were probably just too slow firing. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

One of the M-19s is on display at the Army Museum in Rawalpindi, the rest that were in service now seem to be at CMT&SD Golra. Despite them being marked as 'CURRENT' they were retired many years ago. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The rest of the captured Iraqi MTLB APCs are with the other war trophies. None of them are battle damaged bar splinter scars on some. They were probably just abandoned by the Iraqis as they fled the battlefield. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

This TELAR/APC is claimed to be from Afghanistan. Though it is designated an APC it may be an engineering vehicle, or a reloading unit for the SA-8 Gecko SAM system which this TELAR is usually associated with. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The M-4 was part of the equipment package provided to Pakistan by America under the Mutual Defense Assistance Programme. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The resident M-32B1 ARVs. The M4E4 tanks seem to have found a place in the museum or as gate guardians and other monuments around the country. ARVs however, do not seem to make inspiring monuments. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

With the elements and rust fast eroding the identity of the assembled M-7s it is still possible to see the mailed fist insignia of 1 Armoured Division on this example. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

Perhaps the most surprising vehicle present is this LVT-1 amphibious vehicle as Pakistan is not really a country which is associated with the capability or the need for it. Its history is a bit of a mystery. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The captured Iraqi T-62 is easily identifiable due to its sand over olive drab colour scheme, the shields to protect the spotlights from small arms fire, and the marking on the mid-barrel fume extractor. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The Type-59II was, despite its reputation for being crude and basic even for a copy of a Soviet design, perhaps one of the best tanks the PA ever operated due to its rugged simplicity. Over 2,000 were purchased. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

This rather worse for wear M-5 artillery tractor was supplied to Pakistan by America under the Mutual Defense Assistance Programme. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

The large number of M-47Ms have been at Golra since they were retired having been superseded by more modern types of MBT in the PA. They will eventually be disposed of through auction. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)
Some fairly recent arrivals are the large number of Type-69IIs. These 105mm armed tanks were the first tanks to be constructed in Pakistan as part of the programme that has culminated in the Al-Khalid MBT. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)
Some Type-69IIs in the PA had their 105mm gun barrels painted a bright emerald or turquoise. The reason for this is not entirely clear, but they have been tanks used for training purposes. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)
The M-48A5 was the last western MBT to serve in the PA. It served well into the 1990s. The chassis survives in service as a basis for some engineering vehicles. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

Pakistan received approximately 200 76mm equipped M4E4 Sherman tanks that took part in both major Indo-Pak wars. Short-sightedness and lack of industrial capability meant they were not upgraded to their full potential. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

A real surprise is to find a solitary T-34/85 stored along with the Sherman and Sherman ARVs. It dates from after the 1965 war when Pakistan received a small number of weapons from the USSR. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

Standing next to the T-34/85 is a T-34 ARV that was supplied along with the tanks. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

A small number of Chinese built Type-60-I tracked tractors are present. In Chinese service they are mainly used as artillery tractors so they could have been supplied to Pakistan with Chinese origin artillery pieces. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

Again, crude but effective seems to be the order of the day with the dummy M-109 SPA. Usman Ansari 2007 (All rights reserved)

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